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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 | History

3 edition of Plant nonprotein amino and imino acids found in the catalog.

Plant nonprotein amino and imino acids

Gerald A. Rosenthal

Plant nonprotein amino and imino acids

biological, biochemical, and toxicological properties

by Gerald A. Rosenthal

  • 329 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Academic Press in New York, N.Y .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Amino acids.,
  • Amino acids -- Toxicology.,
  • Imino acids.,
  • Botanical chemistry.,
  • Plants -- Metabolism.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementGerald A. Rosenthal.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQK898.A5 R67 1982
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 273 p. :
    Number of Pages273
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3482260M
    ISBN 100125977808
    LC Control Number82001651

    l-Canaline can be reductively cleaved to l-homoserine, a non-protein amino acid of great importance in the formation of a host of essential amino acids. In this way, the third nitrogen atom of canavanine enters into the reactions of nitrogen metabolism of the plant. As . Bell, ). Many 'non-protein' amino acids are synthesised by plants, and in some cases constitute part of their chemical armoury against pathogens, predators or other species competing for the same resources (Fowden et al., ). Microorganisms can also use selectively toxic amino acids to gain advantage over competing organisms .

    The D-amino acid oxidase enzymes are able to convert amino acids into imino acids. Also the direct biosynthetic precursor to Compare New & Used Books and College Textbooks Prices. Plant Nonprotein Amino and Imino Acids; Biological, Biochemical, and Toxicological Properties Plant. DURING recent years, several new amino- and imino-acids have been characterized as components of the non-protein nitrogen fraction of plant materials. Another example has now been found in seeds.

    The others are called non-standard or non­ protein amino acids. Out of 20 standard amino acids nineteen are a-amino acids and proline is the exceptional α-imino acid having α- imino group (-NH-). Each a-amino acid consists of an amino group (-NH 2), a carboxyl group, (-COOH), a hydrogen atom and a variable side chain or R- group bonded to a. If non-protein amino acids are taken up by herbivores, microorganisms or other plants, they may interfere with their metabolism. Aminobutyric acid (Abu) is a non-protein amino acid that can protect certain plants against pathogens; for instance, when introduced into Arabidopis plants, it has the ability to induce resistance to certain pathogens.


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Plant nonprotein amino and imino acids by Gerald A. Rosenthal Download PDF EPUB FB2

Plant Nonprotein Amino and Imino Acids: Biological, Biochemical, and Toxicological Properties provides a comprehensive discussion of plant nonprotein amino acids. Much of this monograph is written with the neophyte in mind, thus necessitating the presentation of certain basic concepts that are well-known to the advanced worker.

Plant Nonprotein Amino and Imino Acids: Biological, Biochemical, and Toxicological Properties provides a comprehensive discussion of plant nonprotein amino acids.

Much of this monograph is written with the neophyte in mind, thus necessitating the presentation of certain basic concepts that are well-known to the advanced Edition: 1. Buy Plant Nonprotein Amino and Imino Acids: Biological, Biochemical, and Toxicological Properties on FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders Plant Nonprotein Amino and Imino Acids: Biological, Biochemical, and Toxicological Properties: Rosenthal, Gerald A.: : BooksCited by: Plant nonprotein amino and imino acids: biological, biochemical, and toxicological properties.

[Gerald A Rosenthal] Book: All Authors / Contributors: Gerald A Rosenthal. Find more information about: ISBN: OCLC Number: Description. Get this from a library. Plant Nonprotein Amino and Imino Acids: Biological, Biochemical and Toxicological Properties.

[Gerald Rosenthal] -- Plant Nonprotein Amino and Imino Acids. The approximately twenty or so amino (and imino) acids that comprise proteins are well known; less familiar are what is now approaching nonprotein amino acids that have been isolated and characterized from plant, fungal or animal sources.

Those nonprotein amino acids found in food and fodder plants and known to be toxic to man and domestic animals are described. These include toxins from many legume genera including Lathyrus, from other higher plant families, from seaweeds, and from fungi. Some inhibit protein synthesis, while others are incorporated into proteins with toxic effects.

Food Chemistry 6 () NON-PROTEIN AMINO ACIDS OF PLANTS L. FOWDEN Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, Great Britain Received: 22 September, ) ABSTRACT Protein forms the major mtrogenous constituent of plants, but other essential nitrogen-containing materials present in all plants include the nucleic acids, chlorophyll and Cited by: Abstract.

In Greenstein and Winitz [1] listed some ninety amino or imino acids of non-protein origin. Scratch a reasonably well-informed biologist today and he might tell you that there are probably about two hundred natural amino acids now known. Technically, any organic compound with an amine (-NH 2) and a carboxylic acid (-COOH) functional group is an amino acid.

The proteinogenic amino acids are small subset of this group that possess central carbon atom (α- or 2-) bearing an amino group, a carboxyl group, a side chain and an α-hydrogen levo conformation, with the exception of glycine, which is achiral, and proline, whose amine.

The following structures of known nonprotein amino acids, and the plant species from which they have been isolated, are derived from: Rosenthal GA Plant nonprotein amino and imino acids. Biological, Biochemical and Toxicological Properties.

Academic Press, New York. B-alanine (3-alanine). FUNGITOXIC EFFECTS OF NONPROTEIN IMINO ACIDS Bioassay. Spores(5 to 10daysold) wereharvested with an inoculating loop and suspended in medium (GIBCO Laboratories, Grand Island, N.Y.) tissue culture medium with Earle salts adjusted to pH with 1 Nhydrochloric acid.

Spores were washed twice with medium to free them from nutrient contamination and stirred to ensure a. The Biochemistry of Plants: A Comprehensive Treatise, Volume 5: Amino Acids and Derivatives provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of plant biochemistry relating to the metabolism of amino acids with emphasis on amino acids present in proteins.

This book discusses the metabolism of sulfur and nitrogen from the inorganic. Rosenthal GA Plant nonprotein amino and imino acids. Biological, Biochemical and Toxicological Properties. Academic Press, New York. Rosenthal GA Metabolism of L-canavanine and L-canaline in leguminous plants.

Plant Physiol. Rosenthal GA Purification and characterization of the higher plant enzyme L-canaline reductase. Proc. Imino acids are related to amino acids, which contain both amino (-NH 2) and carboxyl (-COOH) functional groups, differing in the bonding to the nitrogen.

The D-amino acid oxidase enzymes are able to convert amino acids into imino acids. Also the direct biosynthetic precursor to the amino acid proline is the imino acid (S)-Δ 1-pyrrolinecarboxylate (P5C).

The term "imino acid" is an obsolete term for this group that should not be used in this context because an imino acid actually the "Gold Book") ().Online corrected version: () "Imino acids".

H2 Another way to form imidic acids is the reaction of carboxylic acids with azanone. For example, the reaction for carbamic In chemistry, an imidic acid is any molecule that contains.

New Soluble Nitrogen Compounds (Amino- and Imino-Acids and Amides) in Plants. In book: Plant Toxins, pp (Nunn et al., ). Since non-protein amino acids (and imino acids) are present in legumes, fruits, seeds and nuts, they are ubiquitous in the diets of human.

What are non-protein amino acids. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins or peptides comprising of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulphur, nitrogen, carboxylic acid, and amino groups. However, there are certain amino acids which are not involved in primary metabolism, and are not part of any proteinic molecule.

Only 20 amino acids take part in the synthesis of extant proteins (Akram et al., ), but ten among them appeared to be spontaneously produced by spike discharge in a reducing atmosphere as.

About this book. For years scientists at the Rothamsted Experimental Station have studied aspects of plant nitrogen nutrition and amino acid biosynthesis. Amino Acids and their Derivatives in Higher Plants is the result of a meeting held to mark this century and a half of work there.Amino acids play a role in the defence mechanisms and stress responses of plants, as well as in food quality and safety for humans and animals.

Recent advances in the field make a comprehensive overview of the information a necessity; this book collates chapters on plant enzymes and metabolism, modulation, molecular aspects and secondary products.5. Biosynthesis of Aromatic Amino Acids: Among the protein amino acids, there are three which are aromatic.

These are phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. Biosynthesis of these amino acids is interlinked and has a common key intermediate, shikimic acid.

This compound is the first six-carbon ring structure produced from aliphatic precursors.